We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Privacy Policy
+86 186 5925 8188
info@3dprotofab.com
EN

Resource

FAQ

What is SLA 3d printing?
Stereolithography (SLA) is an additive manufacturing - commonly referred to as 3D printing - technology that converts liquid materials into solid parts, layer by layer, by selectively curing them using a light source in a process called photopolymerization.

How does SLA 3d printing work?
Stereolithography (SLA) printing was first invented in the 1980's and works by curing resin with light. The light solidifies a liquid resin via a process called photo-polymerization and builds objects layer by layer.

What is the difference between SLA and SLS?
So, what is the difference between SLA and SLS? There are some common denominators, for example, both use a laser to trace out and build individual layers. ForSLA a liquid resin is cured, whereas in SLS powder is selectively fused together.

What is SLA resin made of?
SLA uses a UV laser to cure liquid resin into hardened plastic in a process called photopolymerization. Different combinations of the monomers, oligomers, photoinitiators, and various other additives that comprise a resin result in different material properties. SLA produces parts from thermoset polymers.

Who uses 3d printers?
Companies like Ford, Volvo, and BMW really uses 3D printing for rapid prototyping, experimental parts, and creating jigs and fixtures for manufacturing. Mercedes-Benz which is currently pioneering this niche among other truck producers, and makes more than 100 000 printed prototypes each year.

What is SLA stereo?
Stereolithography (SLA or SL; also known as stereolithography apparatus, optical fabrication, photo-solidification, or resin printing) is a form of 3D printing technology used for creating models, prototypes, patterns, and production parts in a layer by layer fashion using photopolymerization, a process by which light causes chains of molecules to link, forming polymers.[1] Those polymers then make up the body of a three-dimensional solid. Research in the area had been conducted during the 1970s, but the term was coined by Chuck Hull in 1984 when he applied for a patent on the process, which was granted in 1986.[citation needed]Stereolithography can be used to create things such as prototypes for products in development, medical models, and computer hardware, as well as in many other applications. While stereolithography is fast and can produce almost any design, it can be expensive.

What 3d printing can do?
3D printing or additive manufacturing is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The creation of a 3D printed object is achieved using additive processes. In an additive process an object is created by laying down successive layers of material until the object is created.

What file formats are used in 3D Printing?
The most common and universal file formats for 3D printing are STL and VRML. STL stands for “stereolithography” – it is a 3D rendering that contains only a single color. This is typically the file format you would use with desktop 3D printers. VRML (“vermal”, .WRL file extension) stands for “Virtual Reality Modeling Language” – it is a newer digital 3D file type that also includes color, so it can be used on desktop 3D printers with more than one extruder (i.e. two more nozzles that each can print with a different color plastic), or with full-color binder jetting technology.
Additive Manufacturing File Format (.AMF) is a new XML-based open standard for 3D printing. Unlike STL, it contains support for color. They can also be compressed to about half the size of a compressed STL file. AMF is not widely used at present, but in future we would like to add this an option for uploading and downloading files to and from the NIH 3D Print Exchange.
Another file format input for 3D printers in GCode. This file contains detailed instructions for a 3D printer to follow for each slice, like the starting point for each layer and the "route" that the nozzle or print head will follow in laying down the material. In addition, 3D printer manufacturers may have their own proprietary input file formats that contain instructions specific to the methodology for that make or model, and that are compatible only with that manufacturer's software. This does not create a barrier to printing with these machines, as the proprietary file format is generated from the user's own STL or WRL file. 

Why 3d printing is the future?
3D printing, or additive manufacturing, has the potential to democratize the production of goods, from food to medical supplies, to great coral reefs. In the future, 3D printingmachines could make their way into homes, businesses, disaster sites, and even outer space.
 
What is 3d printer resin?
Instead of using powder or filament, Stereolithography technology uses a liquid resin to produce 3D prints. ... The 3D printing process takes place in a large tank filled with liquid resin. To start the process, a layer of UV-sensitive liquid polymer is spread over a platform.

What is 3d slicing?
There are two major types of software that will allow printing a (good read-to-print) 3Dmodel file: A so-called slicer takes a3D drawing (most often in .STL format) and translates this model into individual layers. It then generates the machine code that the printer will use for printing. ... 3D printing.

Can I make money with a 3d printer?
One of the easiest ways to make money with a 3D printer is to offer the printer as a commercial service or to sell items that are made with it. Businesses and individuals often want objects produced through 3D printing, but don’t have the equipment. Additionally, as a skilled designer, you can make items and sell them. For both approaches, you can find robust marketplace communities that help to facilitate your services.

Is 3d printing expensive?
In general, you could say that 3D printing small objects is cheap and 3D printinglarge objects is expensive. Prices go up exponentially as the object size increases. ... And although precious metals are even more expensive, jewelry production is very suitable for 3D printing.